Bill’s Bookshelf # 5: Earthworks by Brian W. Aldiss

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When I was a kid, my parents enrolled me in a Science Fiction Book Club. I received book once a month and got to choose which ones to keep. I wanted to keep all of them. The only problem was, during the summer I spent more time out with my friends, riding my bicycles, going to movies, swimming, and hiking in the woods, and less time reading. There were a couple of books I never got around to reading. One of those books was Earthworks, by Brian W. Aldiss. The picture I use as a logo for “Bill’s Bookshelf” is an actual section of the bookshelves in my room in the house I grew up in. When I visited my mother in Virginia, about three months ago, I picked up Earthworks and brought it back to Florida.

Earthworks is a genuinely good book, the kind of science fiction book that I always hope to find among the myraid of choices that line fill the shelves of used book stores. But because I’m in the process of editing a book and working toward a deadline, I’ve decided that instead of writing extensively about Earthworks myself,  I will refer all visitors to Bill Ectric’s Place to some commentary from Graeme K Talboys at Grumbooks.

3 responses to “Bill’s Bookshelf # 5: Earthworks by Brian W. Aldiss”

  1. Well, I prefer his 50s short stories over what I’ve read of his 60s short stories… So perhaps No Time Like The Future or What Can Replace a Man? might be good places to start.

  2. I’ll have to read some of his short fiction, then. Earthworks is the only thing I’ve read by Aldiss.

    1. Well, I prefer his 50s short stories over what I’ve read of his 60s short stories… So perhaps No Time Like The Future or What Can Replace a Man? might be good places to start.

  3. I was underwhelmed by this work. I adore Aldiss but generally his short fiction. I found the prose top quality but the ending essentially advocated complete war — rather disturbing if you think about it.

    My favorite of the overpopulation / utra-pollution themed works is John Brunner’s masterpiece Stand on Zanzibar (1968)…

    1. I’ll have to read some of his short fiction, then. Earthworks is the only thing I’ve read by Aldiss.

      1. Well, I prefer his 50s short stories over what I’ve read of his 60s short stories… So perhaps No Time Like The Future or What Can Replace a Man? might be good places to start.

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